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Interested in the Creative Arts?







Join The Arts Society, Hillingdon to enjoy expert lectures, special interest days and stimulating outings.

Membership costs just £54.00 per year, excluding Special Interest Days and Outings.

Get discount entry to many UK galleries & museums with an Arts Society Membership Card.

Receive Arts Society Review, a quarterly glossy packed with arts news, including exclusive features by leading arts writers.

Come along to one of our lectures for just £9.00 - free if you join on the day!

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Lecture - 18TH CENTURY LANDSCAPE GARDENS & ART

Wednesday 9 October at 2.00 pm Lecturer Michael Liversidge


Michael is a speaker with a wide range of artistic expertise. He is now Emeritus Dean of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Bristol, having taught in the History of Art Department for over thirty years, meanwhile curating art exhibitions in museums including Birmingham. He is currently a Visiting Professor in the History of Art at the University of Buckingham.

His particular interests include British art from the Renaissance to the early 20th century, especially landscape art and garden history of the 18th and 19th centuries. He is currently completing a study of an anonymously published obscene Georgian 'novel' which sheds new light on the meaning of Sir Francis Dashwood's pleasure grounds at West Wycombe as a site for sexual indulgence.

Lecture - The CHRISTMAS STORY in MEDIEVAL ART

Wednesday 11 December at 2.00 pm  Lecturer Sally Dormer

Dr Sally Dormer is a specialist medieval art historian and lecturer, with an MA in Medieval Art History and a PhD on medieval manuscript illumination from the Courtauld Institute, University of London.

She is Dean of European studies, an under-graduate study-abroad semester for two American universities, and teaches, or has taught, for the Arts Society, Art Pursuits, Gresham College and Swan Hellenic.



It was during the Middle Ages that many of the familiar images associated with the Christmas Story were devised and popularised including the stable in Bethlehem inhabited by the ox and the ass. What were the sources of these images? Are they always of biblical origin?

This lecture, illustrated by images taken from sources as diverse as illuminated manuscripts, church portals, liturgical vestments, stained glass windows and goldsmiths' work, will tell the stories surrounding Christ's birth and investigate the often-surprising sources for certain aspects of this well-known narrative.

Lectures are held at Winston Churchill Theatre, Pinn Way, Ruislip HA4 7QL.  Special Interest Days are held at Uxbridge Golf Club, The Drive, Uxbridge UB10 8AQ.  Non-members are welcome to come to Lectures for just £9 - free if you join on the day. For Special Interest Days non-members not attending a Lecture should telephone Sylvia Jones (01895 677041) or Pam Cook (01895 833725) for details.

Study Day - The FOUNDING of the BRITISH MUSEUM Lecturer Caroline MacDonald-Haig

Thursday 7 November at 10.30 am at Uxbridge Golf Club

In 2003 the British Museum celebrated 250 years since that founding Act. we will hear the extraordinary story of how some of the Museum’s most famous assets such as the Rosetta Stone,  


The cost for the day, inc. coffee and lunch, is £30. To book contact Mrs. Pam Cook, 35 Woodhurst Drive, Denham, UB9 SLL. 01895 833725.

CAROLINE MACDONALD-HAIG   Design and Decorative Arts journalist and author. A London Blue Badge Guide, specialising in themed tours for American Museums and Art Galleries. Her specialist subjects include the history of glass and London's history, galleries, museums and architecture. She is a freelance lecturer for Adult Education Groups. Enjoys devising tours, lecturing and study days based in and around London.

and the 4th century BC Parthenon Marbles came to Bloomsbury and learn a little of the eccentricities of the collectors who donated or sold their lifetime’s learning to edify us.

We will also look at the British Library which moved from the British Museum to St Pancras in 1998, releasing the internal courtyard space it used to occupy to create the Great Court.

The old domed library, once called ‘the cranium of the nation’, now used for exhibitions, still stands at the centre of architect Norman Foster’s dazzling web of glass and metal which covers the Great Court. which draws admiration from over 6 million visitors a year.